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Remix | Non Pratt | Review

*image via Goodreads

Schools out and the Summer is in full swing for best friends Kaz and Ruby as they hurtle headfirst off to Remix music festival for a three days of boozing, bands and boys. All is not all puppies and rainbows though. In the limbo between School and 6th Form College, both girls are dealing with break ups, family drama, broken hearts and that little thing called growing up.
But hey, that won’t get in the way of all the fun they’re about to have at Remix, right?...

So what’s my verdict?

I was really looking forward to ticking this off my TBR and it definitely lived up to expectations.
Personally my favourite thing about the book is the way Kaz and Ruby’s relationship was presented. As much as we’d like to believe our relationships with our best friends are perfect, in reality they’re messy, full of petty arguments and is always a work in progress. Kaz and Ruby are still very much trying to figure out what works for their relationship outside of the context of school and in contrast with their family, friends and romantic attachments. Yes, the boys do play a pivotal role in their lives but in the end it’s pretty clear the girls do love each other much more than any guy and preserving that friendship is ultimately what motivates both of them throughout the story. 

The duel narration plays off this well as it alternates between Kaz and Ruby’s viewpoints in short bursts, meaning you not only get the full story but a frustrating juxtaposition of the girl’s contrasting inner monologues too.

Thematically Pratt manages to relay some seriously important messages about sex, particularly regarding consent, manipulation and power dynamics. The book captures that time period of awkward teenage-hood and ‘pseudo adulthood’ really well, and in retrospect, as an ‘older YA reader, reading the situations that Kaz and Ruby get themselves into almost felt like I was taking a glimpse back to me and my friends at 16. And though the book does delve into some meatier topics, the humour and more dramatic moments are balanced without feeling preachy.

A definite recommend from me if you’re after a quick YA fix and a refreshing take on female friendships.

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